SSAS Server Cant See Its Own Cubes in SSMS

I’ve got an oddball situation going on here (I know what you’re thinking: Par for the course).  I’ve built out a pair of new Windows Server 2008 R2 \ SQL Server 2008 SP1 CU5 machines.  Both are running great and returning data faster than anything we’ve ever seen before except for one small problem:  One of the servers can’t see it’s own cubes.  The cubes are there and everything.  I can connect to them with BIDS to deploy updates, SSMS to process them, and I can even query the cubes and get results back in Excel.  The server itself just can’t see them.

Here’s what it looks like if you’re logged into the machine directly:

LocalConnection  

And then here’s what it looks like if you connect to that same server from my desktop or any other server:

RemoteConnection

Another weird thing is that the other server that was built out the same way at the same time can see it’s own cubes just fine.  It’s just this one server that can’t see it’s own cubes.

I’ve only heard of one other person who has seen this behavior so the whole point of this blog post is just to see if anyone else is running into this issue.  If so please comment and we can get a connect issue filed if it’s prevalent enough reproduceible.

* Please Note: The names have been changed  to protect the innocent servers under my corrupting influence control.

**  Please take a look at the comments below:
***  As a work-around you can Right-Click on the SSMS icon and select > Run as Administrator to get SSMS to see it’s own cubes:  “If you skip step in the setup where it asked you to add current user to AS server admin role, then you would need to run SSMS as administrator.”

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3 Responses

  1. Vidas and Edward,

    Thanks for the info! In my infinite spare time this weekend < / sarcasm> I’m going to build out a new VM and see if I can reproduce it that way.
    🙂

  2. I got answer on your issue from Edward Melomed (Microsoft):

    “I would guess after all this does has to do with security.
    But with Windows security – UAC.

    If you skip step in the setup where it asked you to add current user to AS server admin role, then you would need to run SSMS as administrator.

    Why BIDS works- I think Visual Studio gets exception from UAC. It always runs with admin privileges.”

    And you already confirmed that running SSMS as administrator helped.

  3. I would guess this has to do with Windows security – UAC.

    If you skip step in the setup where it asked you to add current user to AS server admin role, then you would need to run SSMS as administrator.

    HTH.
    Edward Melomed

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